BOWMAN among the LENAPE

Bowman family name appears in documents dating from 1758->
The Brothertown Lenape Indians (also Brotherton), located in Wisconsin, are a Native American tribe formed in the early nineteenth century from communities of several Pequot and Mohegan (Algonquian-speaking) tribes of southern New England and eastern Long Island, New York. In the 1780s after the American Revolutionary War, they migrated from New England into New York state, where they accepted land from the Iroquois Oneida Nation in Oneida County.

Under pressure from the United States government, the Brothertown Indians, together with the Stockbridge-Munsee and some Oneida, removed to Wisconsin in the 1830s, taking ships through the Great Lakes. In 1839 they were the first tribe of Native Americans in the United States to accept United States citizenship and have their communal land allocated to individual households, in order to prevent another removal further west. Most of the Oneida and many of the Delaware were relocated to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma).


Lester Skeesuk (Brothertown Indian), ca. 1920

Isaac Still (sometimes written, Stille or Stelle), Moses Tunda Tatamy and John Pumpshire were among those chosen to negotiate for this Reservation. Teedyuscung and George Hopayock signed the original land transfer, as Delaware tribal officials.

Ashatama
Bowman
Breant
Calvin
Claus (probably the same as Nicholuss)
Conchee
Cousher
Cuish
Daniell
Evans
George
Gosling
Johnston/Johnson
Joshua
Kekalah
Kekott
Lemons
Loques (same family as Peepy)
Lowlax
Mitop
Moore
Mullis
News
Nicholuss (probably the same as Claus)
Peepy (same family as Loques)
Pombolus
Quaquay
Quela
Sampson/Samson
Skekit/Skicket
Skeesuk
Stille
Store
Swauela/Swanneluh
Tallman
Thomas [maybe-needs more research]
Thompson/Tomson
West
Wheelwright
Williams
Woolley

The Bowman family is a special case among the Brotherton Reservation Indians. So far as I can tell, nobody named Bowman lived on the Reservation before it was sold, in 1802. HOWEVER, the family of Job Moore and his wife, Sophia Calvin (b.1784), daughter of Bartholomew Calvin (Shawuskhkung – “Wilted Grass”), remained there long after the sale. I’ve been trying to determine just how many Brotherton Lenape remained in New Jersey after most of them left, in 1802. Checking the 1830 and 1840 federal censuses for Evesham Township (wherein the reservation lied), there seems to have been just two families. In 1830, the family of Sophia Moore (widow of the last Brotherton headman, Job Moore), had 10 people in the household. In 1840, this household had split into three households, all living next door to one another. Sophia Moore’s family now had 4 people in the house; Job Moore’s family had 4 people in his house (this is Job Moore, Jr.); and, Elizabeth Boman (i.e., Bowman) had 6 people in her house. (I think Elizabeth was Elizabeth Moore, Sophia’s daughter.) By 1850, all these folks are gone from New Jersey and are living in Wisconsin with the Stockbridge-Munsee. Judging from the birth locations of Job Moore’s children, they had moved there around 1843 or 1844. Elizabeth was born about 1814. I do not know who her husband, named Bowman, was. She had a son, Bartholomew Bowman, born about 1834. You can find all these folks in the federal censuses of Wisconsin, for 1850-1900, and beyond. sources: http://lenapetexts.com

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